Teacher Wellbeing: A Relaxing Christmas and New Year 2021.

teacher wellbeing
Teacher wellbeing is something we should all be talking about. Teachers have shown their great ability to adapt to...

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teacher wellbeing

Teacher Wellbeing

When the classrooms are empty, and no pens or pencils are being used. Teachers all over the UK will be relieved that this term has ended. These past two years have been incredibly hard but we couldn’t be more grateful for the continual amazing work and effort teachers put in for our students to keep advancing.

The current pandemic has been incredibly difficult for everybody, but the pressure it has put on teachers, heads, and school staff has been overwhelming. The 2021 survey for teacher wellbeing results have shown that teachers are being more than resilient regardless of the stress levels rising, (Source) this is especially the case for senior school leaders whose stress levels have doubled since 2020.

teacher wellbeing
Teacher Wellbeing Survey 2021

Teachers have shown their great ability to adapt to situations as well as keep professionalism and passion for their job. However, a worrying 77% of teachers in schools are experiencing poor mental health symptoms such as insomnia and difficulty concentrating or doing things they enjoy. Sadly, we know that this is not new news, and it’s a struggle most teachers have had to face during the pandemic.

Time for you

As we near Christmas and the end of term, it may be the first-time teachers and other school staff are getting time for themselves to pause and breathe. With all the adrenalin from the term slowly easing off, it is completely normal to feel down and quite frankly, tired. So we invited you to keep reading to find out ways in which teachers can prioritise their mental health during the festive season.

teacher wellbeing

Teacher Wellbeing Tips

Reconnect with your purpose.

This is an important self-reflection exercise for teacher wellbeing. Remind yourself why you became a teacher in the first place, and this could be done in many ways! Look back at old photos of yourself when you were in school, look through your degree/qualifications, reflect on past students and your strategies that have helped to make a difference in pupils lives. This activity is meant to highlight your growth as a teacher, allowing you to be grateful and kind to yourself!

Boundaries.

This is an important one and most often forgotten about. Not just in education, but in every job. Therefore, it is only right to separate home and school completely. Every day, make sure you are sticking to your boundaries and not letting others cross them. You can try and develop an end-of-day routine to help you switch mindsets.

This could even include debriefing sessions with other teachers. Because let’s be honest, teaching can be an emotional and mentally taxing job, this is exactly why debriefing can help support you through challenging times.

Reward Yourself.

Much like the “treat yo’ self” attitude, however, be conscious of what you are rewarding yourself for. It is important to be responsible for one’s achievements. So, plan a day, or evening that is all about you – and make a habit out of it.

Your rewards could be as simple as renting a film on NowTV or binge-watching your favourite show. From having a pyjama day to hiking your local fields – whatever you do, make sure it is rewarding to you.

Cooking Activities

Sleeping Habits.

I feel like you knew this was coming. But we cannot talk about teacher wellbeing and mental health without mentioning the importance of creating good sleeping habits. Most people assume that to change bad habits, we must instantly erase them from our persona. However, that is less likely to work. You are better off introducing new, positive habits, which will eventually overtake the bad ones.

Let’s say – for this example – that you normally fall asleep around midnight, 1 am, and you wake up at 6 am to get ready for work. And let’s be honest, working on only 6 hours of rest is not ideal. Teachers ought to sleep a minimum of 7 hours. A good habit to introduce for this routine is, for example, an exact time when you will get into bed, even if you stay awake reading or watching TV.

teacher wellbeing

If you feel like you are struggling to rest, reach out to your GP for the right support you deserve. You can find more information on sleep here.

Respect Yourself.

The thing about wellbeing which no one talks about is how lonely one can get. When you are actively trying to put yourself first and take care of yourself, others might find that intimidating and become distant. But it is important to remember who you’re doing this for – and that is yourself. You owe it to yourself to be extra nice and caring to who you are and to surround yourself with those who care and want what’s best for you.

Join local classes like yoga or pottery making, you’ll be surprised who you can meet and the fun you can have.

But overall, remember no matter how you feel there is always someone out there that is there to listen and support you. Please do not forget that there are many charities and support groups that are there to help YOU. Educational Support is available 24/7 and has immediate, confidential support which includes counselling and advice. Source:

For more tips on teacher wellbeing, why don’t you check out our Guide to Life article? Here.

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