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Explore the Planet of Phobia and

Unmask Phonics with Emile.

Phonics games vampire EMile

Rocket Reading in Your School

Designed for Use at Home & in Class

Run Class Competitions.

Set off for the Spooky Planet Phobia.

Rocket Reading in your School!

Our games have been developed with our partners from Manchester Metropolitan University’s Faculty of Education, so you can rest assured that they meet and cover all the phonemes, graphemes in the Year 1 Screening Check. We even have pseudo-words covered!

Maths SPag and phonics games emile zombie
Adaptive maths app

Gamified Personalised Learning Journey.

All our Emile products harness the power of games-based learning and gamification.

Students are engaged by an enchanting adventure, crazy characters, enthralling game modes, ultra competitive class competitions, school leaderboards for most effort & most improved, reward systems that encourage more use and trophies to display. All these features lead students to wanting to answer questions, explore new concepts or revisit known topics.

By making use of a simple Assess, Practise and Achieve model, we ensure that students are working at the right level and are making progress.

Aligned to the Letters & Sounds Phonics Scheme.

Phonics with Emile follows the six phases of the Letters & Sounds Phonics Scheme. 

Phonics Emile werewolf

How Does Phonics with Emile Help?

Phonics resource & games

Phonics with Emile engages young children to practice their reading based on the 6 phonics phases of Letters and Sounds. 

In short, your students will want to do phonics! 

They will want to try and read words to get to the next level. 

They will ask to use Phonics with Emile to try and unlock new clothes for their tamagotchi. 

They will beg their parents to use Phonics with Emile at home so they can compete safely with their peers. 

Just Some of Our Phonics Games

This is just a taster of our phonics games to give you an idea of what students will see. Of course, the best way to experience what a student will see is to sign up for a trial. (Remember we have more games in the app.)

Rating Game:

Our Rating Game runs through phonics sounds without a time limit. 

The Level achieved helps decide the student’s personalised learning journey. 

Reach certain Levels and unlock more clothes for your tamagotchi.

Multi-Player Games:

Challenge class mates to a Battle or take on the world. 

See who can answer the most consecutive time table facts correctly!

Earn coins and uncover trophies.  

Tamagotchi:

Every student gets their own tamagotchi. Feed, play with and grow their tamagotchi by unlocking levels on the time table planet of Meso. 

 

Phonics Asteroids

Emile is travelling to the planet Phobia. help him avoid asteroids and collect gems on the way. 

 

Study by the University of Manchester

The University of Manchester were given access to all the results and progress made within Phonics with Emile from February 2020 to May 2020. (All the data was of course anonymised in line with our Data Protection Policy and GDPR.)

phonics improvement

The raw data showed that over a 12 week period, students increased the percentage of correct questions by nearly 10%.  

This is impressive as the students will have been advancing through the phases at the same time as getting more questions correct. 

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What is "Phonics"?

Phonics is the principle technique used to teach children in reception and year 1 to read.

It runs alongside other teaching methods such as Guided Reading and Shared Reading to help children develop all the other vital reading skills and hopefully give them a real love of reading.

Phonics was implemented in schools following the Rose Review in 2006. The report had very clear instructions about the teaching of early reading. This was very welcome as there was a lot of confusion about what schools should be doing to teach reading.

What are Phonemes?

Phonics teaches children to read by teaching them the sounds that make up the English language. These sounds are called “phonemes”. There are 44 phonemes in the English language.

Some examples of phonemes are:

1 letter – p, c, k.

2 letters – sh, oi, ow, ah.

3 letters – tch, igh.

4 letters – ough, eigh.

 

What is a Grapheme?

A grapheme is the way a phoneme is written. So a grapheme is “sh”, where the phoneme is the sound.

What is Grapheme-Phoneme Correspondence (GPC)?

Grapheme-Phoneme Correspondence (GPC) is the process of matching phonemes to graphemes, or the sounds to the way they are written. This is of course the essence of reading and spelling.

What is Blending?

Blending is where children merge phonemes together to make a word.

So a child seeing the word or grapheme “cat”, knows the sounds or phonemes for “c”, “a” and “t”, merges the phonemes together until they can hear what the word is.

Therefore, blending is a child using the Grapheme-Phoneme Correspondence (GPC) to determine what word is written or more simply blending is how a child reads using the sounds represented by the letters.

What is Segmenting?

Segmenting is where children break words down to determine how they are spelt. So a child hearing the word “bed”, would segment the word into the phonemes “b”, “e” and “d”. From there, they would be able to write the phonemes down – as a grapheme – hopefully with the correct spelling. Therefore, segmenting is a child using the Grapheme-Phoneme Correspondence (GPC) to determine how a word is written or more simply segmenting is how a child learns to spell.

What is a Digraph?

Graphemes with two letters that make one phoneme are known as digraphs. For example,

ch as in chat
sh as in ship
th as in thin
wh as in what
ph as in phone
ck as in rock

What is a Split Digraph?

A Split Digraph is where a Digraph is ‘split’ by a consonant. For example, in the word “dime”, the digraph “i_e” has been split by the letter “m” to make a new word, “dime”.

Split digraphs are represented like this: a_e, e_e, i_e, o_e, and u_e.

What is a Trigraph?

Graphemes with three letters that make one phoneme are known as trigraphs. For example:

igh as in sigh
ore as in bore
air as in fair
ear as in dear
are as in dare

Year 1 Phonics Screening Check

What is the Year 1 phonics screening check?

The year 1 phonics screening check is a simple check performed by teachers with all children in Year 1 in England usually in June.

It is designed to help teachers identify children that need additional support so that they do not fall behind their peers in this vital skill. It should not be a stressful situation as the teacher will be well experienced to understand your child’s level of skills. Indeed, struggling in this check may lead to your child receiving extra attention and resources.

What form does the Year 1 phonics screening check take?

The phonics check is an oral check conducted by a teacher. It involves 40 words split into two sections and takes about 5 minutes.

A child will read up to four words per page for their teacher. The teacher will determine if the word has been read correctly. This is a video guide for teachers showing how they should assess and perform the check: https://youtu.be/IPJ_ZEBh1Bk

The Phonics screening check ensures that a child can:

  • Sound out and blend graphemes in order to read simple words.
  • Read phonically decodable one-syllable and two-syllable words, e.g. cat, sand, windmill.
  • Read a selection of nonsense words which are referred to as pseudo words.

How Does Phonics with Emile Help?

Phonics with Emile engages young children to practice their reading based on the 6 phonics phases of Letters and Sounds. 

In short, your students will want to do phonics! 

They will want to try and read words to get to the next level. 

They will ask to use Phonics with Emile to try and unlock new clothes for their tamagotchi. 

They will beg their parents to use Phonics with Emile at home so they can compete safely with their peers. 

After using Phonics with Emile, all students will be well prepared for the phonics screening check. 

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