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Edu-Tweeters for Primary School Teachers

by Glen

So who should a primary school teacher follow on twitter?

There are of course thousands of great edu-tweeters out there, some with huge following some and well known and some less well known.

Below are just a few of our favourites – it was really hard to narrow it down  – and after battling to reduce it down, it Is almost unavoidable that we will do a few more edu-tweeter lists in 2019.

The below is in no particular order (and we’re sure to have missed out some great tweeters).

Jo Morgan @MathsJem

Jo is simply stuffed full of great ideas to teach maths, Her website Resourceaholic is a gold mine. Her website has been viewed nearly 4.5 million times!

Her twitter feed is obsessed with teaching maths.

Twitter Jo morgan @mathsjem

Dylan Wiliam @dylanwiliam

Dylan Wiliam (one “l”) grew up in Cardiff and holds a stunning amount of affiliations and qualifications (as well as being a former teacher in London).

We love his twitter feed as he is focused on good quality educational research and regularly shares resources via dropbox.

His official bio is:

Dylan Wiliam is Emeritus Professor of Educational Assessment at University College London. In a varied career, he has taught in inner-city schools, directed a large-scale testing programme, served a number of roles in university administration, including Dean of a School of Education, and pursued a research programme focused on supporting teachers to develop their use of assessment in support of learning.

twitter Dylan William @DylanWiliam

Sue Cowley 

Sue is full of opinions and questions! Sue’s twitter feed reads like every teacher’s mind. The joys of teaching and being around children, the frustration with policy and reports, are themes which appear again and again in a lovely warm  manner that make followers feel like they know Sue.

twitter Sue Cowley @Sue_Cowley

Tom Rees @TomRees_77

Tom is the Executive Headteacher of Simon de Senlis Primary School and currently works across eleven primary schools as the Education Director of Northampton Primary Academy Trust. He is the author of Wholesome Leadership

What we really love is that his tweets are light hearted and inform.

His pinned tweet is also a favourite here:

A broad, rich and rigorous primary curriculum should be the driver of school improvement, not a casualty of it.”

twitter tom rees @tomrees_77

Debra Kidd @debrakidd

Debra Kidd trained as an English and Drama teacher, and has worked with every age group from nursery through to Post Graduate and still enjoys working with teachers and children every day.

Her book Teaching: Notes from the Front Line highlights that those that love and are passionate about teaching should be setting education policy and is well worth a read – especially by policy makers.

She is the founder of the National Teacher Learning Day the first of which will take place on July 3rd 2020 and which aims to provide an affordable, week day option for teachers who want to be in control of their own CPD needs.

Debra’s twitter feed is full of inspiring stories and comments on the weird and less than wonderful things that happen in schools (typically as a result of management).

twitter debra kidd @debrakidd

David Weston @Informed_Edu

David is a bit of an inspirational figure.

He has setup a number of organisations addressing different issues that affect teachers. These include: the GoodCPDGuide, the Teacher Development Trust and OutTeacher.Org

He has co-written a book – Unleasing Great Teaching – and written a number of articles for The Guardian, the TES, the Telegraph, and SecEd. He has appeared on Sky News, Newsnight, ITV London, and Channel 5 news and given a TEDx talk in the US.

Oh yeah, he also a Governor and a campaigner for organ donations.

David’s twitter feed reflects his belief in the teacher and fundamentally if you want a better education system, you need to invest in teachers.

twitter david weston @Informed_Edu

Tom Bennett @tombennett71

Tom is founder of researchED – a grass-roots, teacher-led project that aims to make teachers research-literate and pseudo-science proof.

He is a Teacher Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University and is the author of four books on teacher-training, behaviour management and educational research.

In 2015, he was long listed for the GEMS Global Teacher Prize, and listed as one of the Huffington Post’s ‘Top Ten Global Educational Bloggers’.

Tom’s twitter feed features a range of topics but highlights good quality research and the impact behaviour can have on educational attainment.

twitter Tom Bennett @tomBennett71

Dughall McCormick @dughall

Dughall is an educational consultant working with schools in the UK. With a background of many years in the primary classroom, he is involved in working to support schools’ use of technologies for innovation and creativity.

Dughall’s excellent tweeter feed (and occasional blog) deal with a whole host of topics but we particularly like his sharing of inspiring tidbits from different conferences he attends and speaks at.

Old Primary head  @OldPrimaryHead1

Bryan is a primary headteacher in the West Country. He has an excellent and regularly updated blog – https://oldprimaryhead.com/ -.

His twitter feed feels like a reflection of the life of all primary heads and he somehow manages to highlight the most interesting tweets from his fellow edu-tweeters.

twitter Old Primary Head @OldPrimaryhead1

Simon Kidwell @SimonKidwell

Simon is a headteacher, a LA SIA and the NAHT Cheshire Branch Secretary. he also finds time to tweet and blog about issues affecting schools.

We particularly like the depth of his blogs and his well thought out and detailed descriptions of the issues and proposed solutions.

Emile Education @Education_Emile

No list of tweeters would be complete without us!

Our tweets are 40% teacher jokes, 20% blogs, 20% educational videos, 20% about us and the schools using our resources.

We always try to follow anyone that follow us!

Emile twitter
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