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Make It Fun: Ideas on Teaching Prefixes

by Naomi

Grammar can be a dry subject for both teachers and students. Yet it is on the national curriculum and fundamental knowledge students need. So teachers sometimes need to be extra resourceful when trying to make a grammar session as engaging as possible.

Below are a few approaches that may make the learning about prefixes more interesting

1. Prefix Race

Introduce a prefix e.g. “bi” and ask for students to write down as may words as they can think about that begin with “bi”. Make it into a race. Which team can find the most words?

After they have written down their lists, ask if anyone can figure out what the prefix may indicate about the work. (Remember “biscuit” comes from cooked twice.)

By having the students work out the meaning of the prefix, they are much more likely to remember the meaning.

(I usually score 1 point for each word on the list and 5 points for the correct meaning.)

2. Involve Root Words and Suffixes

Teaching prefixes in isolation is an option, but the more depth the students understand the subject the better.

Teaching root words, prefixes and suffixes all together can be an effective option.

One of our favourite approaches to this approach is word jigsaws. Print off a list of root words, prefixes and suffixes and have students in teams use all the pieces to make words.

Obviously, the more options the more discussions, the better!

3. Use Technology

It is undeniably true that kids in the 21st century love technology. Most schools are using tablets or computers to help them teaching, which means that finding a good piece of software that helps teaching would be both helpful, and simple.

Grammar with Emile is the perfect tool to use because it uses games, competition and rewards to engage. Assign your students the prefix game or setup a competition and see your students use the power of games-based learning to conquer. Take a no-obligation free look by clicking here.

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